PressMedia_Icon News

Genie News and Updates

Stay up to date with the latest news from Genie - A Terex Brand below or by visiting Genie Aerial Pros.

Genie Aerial Pros is dedicated to educating the aerial industry on important subjects, such as upcoming changes to ANSI and CSA standards, safety and training, service, product introductions and new applications. The website also gives customers’ insights on sales and marketing best practices, company news, as well as upcoming industry and  company events. Content featured on Genie Aerial Pros includes tips and trends articles, product bulletins and videos, industry alerts, customer success stories, testimonials and more.

ANSI & CSA Standards | Ask Me Anything June 10th-14th, 2019

A huge thank you to everyone that participated in this ANSI & CSA Standards | Ask Me Anything with the Genie Team! Stay tuned to Genie Aerial Pros and our social media channels for the next Ask Me Anything Session.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Welcome to Ask Me Anything with Scott Owyen on the new ANSI and CSA Standards!  Watch the brief introduction below for this event:


Additional information on the new MEWP standards can be found here:

 
This Ask Me Anything event has concluded, and we encourage you to view the Q&A from it below: 


Q (Andy Gray): I drop off a lot of equipment after hours or before they start. How will the new regs effect this with training, walk-a-rounds, and etc?

 

A: Hi Andy! Thank you for your question. In the ANSI A92.24 standard for training, under 6.3 Dealer and Owner, subpart 6.3.3, ANSI states that “When requested by the user, dealers and owners shall offer familiarization to the person designated to receive the MEWP”. It doesn’t state that it has to be the delivery driver, although it could be the driver, it just states that familiarization must take place if requested. It could be provided by any representative of the dealer or owner such as a sales person, service technician or other. By the way, this requirement was in the previous standard as well and is not a new requirement.

 

Q (Adam): Do the new standards address adverse weather such as wind and lightning? Please let us know. Thanks! 

 

A: Hi Adam! Thank you for your question. Yes, absolutely! In the ANSI A92.22 standard for safe use, under 6.8 Requirements for Operation, subpart 6.8.2, the standards address weather consideration to include the effects of wind forces on MEWPS (6.8.2.1), effects of wind on equipment in the platform (6.8.2.2), local wind effects (6.8.2.3) and use in thunderstorms (6.8.2.4)..

 

Q (Brad Wadleigh): What was the ANSI standards appeal from ARA about last week?

 

A: Hi Brad! Thank you for your question. This is on everyone’s mind so your timing is perfect! As you are probably aware, the A92.20, A92.22 and A92.24 standards were published in December 2018. In May 2019, the ANSI BSR (Board of Standards Review) heard two appeal requests made against the publication of A92.20 and A92.22, one by the American Rental Association concerning the requirement to ship a Manual of Responsibilities (“MOR”) with every machine and the other by a company called Tutus regarding a requirement to receive manufacturer’s permission prior to making a modification to a MEWP. Following the appeal hearings, the ANSI BSR decided to uphold portions of the appeals related to ANSI’s Commercial Terms policy.

 

The ANSI BSR has given the A92 committee 30 days to put together a plan to address these concerns or else ANSI will withdraw these two standards. If the A92.20 and A92.22 standards are withdrawn, there will be no new requirements to comply with in December 2019; the previous standards will continue to exist as the ANSI design and safe use requirements for Mobile Elevating Work Platforms.

 

The A92 committee chairs met on Wednesday June 5th and drafted new language to address the two issues raised by the appeals. A plan was made that will allow revised language to be submitted for committee vote – if approved, this language could be updated in the standards before December 2019.

 

Q (Arnold Turne): Who’s going to teach job superintendents how to fill out the Risk Assessment and Rescue-Planning paperwork? 

 

A: Hi Arnold! Thank you for your question. OSHA requires that the employer ensure that their employees are properly trained, and that they are trained in a manner that they can understand. ANSI also places the responsibility on the user, which is most commonly the employer, to ensure that employees receive proper training. To assist with these new requirements, Genie has developed a Safe Use Plan Guidance document that provides detailed explanations, guidance, examples and templates to help the industry meet these new standards. The Genie Safe Use Plan Guidance document can be downloaded by visiting //aerialpros.genielift.com/mewp-safe-use-plan/ 

 

Q (Frank Jagermeier): When do the new standards go into effect? 

 

A: Hi Frank! Thank you for your question. If the two current appeals to the standards are satisfactorily addressed within the 6 month period, the standards will be officially in effect on December 20th, 2019.

 

Q (Stan Todd): Why did the ANSI board rule in favor of the ARA appeal of the ANSI standards? 

 

A: Hi Stan! Thank you for your question. The Board of Standards Review will hear appeals when the appellants have exhausted their opportunities of previous appeals at the standards developer level. On May 31, the BSR reached a decision to grant in part each of the two appeals. Specifically, the BSR grants the portions of both appeals that go to the merits of the arguments related to the Commercial Terms Policy. The first appeal from the ARA addressed a requirement that the Manual of Responsibilities (“MOR”) be purchased solely from SAIA and used with every piece of equipment, and pointed out that it constitutes an “endorsement” of SAIA’s MOR under ANSI’s Commercial Terms Policy, and as such is not permissible in an American National Standard (“ANS”).

The second appeal from Tutus argued that the standards’ text providing that “modifications or additions to a MEWP shall be made only with prior written permission of the manufacturer” is a commercial term and as such, is not permissible in an ANS.

 

BSR directs the A92 suite of standard be withdrawn as ANS, unless the Accredited Standards Committee (“ASC”) A92 can demonstrate how the A92 suite of standards can be revised to bring them into compliance with the Commercial Terms Policy.

 

Q (Kathleen Jervis): What is the Manual of Responsibilities, and who does it come from?

 

A: Hi Kathleen! Thank you for your question. The Manual of Responsibilities is taken from the applicable ANSI A92 standards and outlines the responsibilities of manufacturers, dealers, owners, users, supervisors, operators and occupants of MEWPs as they pertain to their safe operation, maintenance and repair. It is developed and published by the Scaffold and Access Industry Association (SAIA), which is the secretariat of the ANSI standards. In other words, they publish and distribute the ANSI standards.

 

Q (Paul): Is the implementation of the standards expected to be delayed by the recent decision of the Board of Standards Review of the American National Standards Institute involving the Manual of Responsibility?

 

A: Hi Paul! Thank you for your question. We hope not but that remains to be seen. The A92 committee chairs met on Wednesday June 5th and drafted new language to address the two issues raised by the appeals. A plan was made that will allow revised language to be submitted for committee vote. If approved, this language could be updated in the standards before December 2019. The committee chairs are recommending no change to the current effectivity date of December 2019. We do believe that the A92 committee realizes the pressure that they are under to resolve this matter rather quickly. Unfortunately, unless the Accredited Standards Committee (“ASC”) A92 can demonstrate how the A92 suite of standards can be revised to bring them into compliance with the Commercial Terms Policy, the Board of Standards Review will direct the A92 suite of standard be withdrawn. If the A92.20 and A92.22 standards are withdrawn, there will be no new requirements to comply with in December 2019; the previous standards will continue to exist as the ANSI design and safe use requirements for Mobile Elevating Work Platforms. 

 

Q (Roland Smith): I inspect my companys MEWP and in the notes I reference the codes; IE a switch is broken I put; ANSI 92.5.4.6.1; Upper Controls.  Switches broken/bent, eStop not locking open.  Are the new MEWP codes different? Are they in 92.20-2018 now? 

 

A: Hi Roland! Thank you for your question. Yes, the ANSI A92.20 design standard outlines those requirements in Section 4.7 – Controls, including Activation and Operation, Direction of Movement,

Location, Accessibility, Protection and Selection among Duplicate Controls, Emergency Stops ,Electrical Switches, Pilot and Solenoid Valves, Restoration of Power after Failure, and Overriding Emergency System.

 

Q (Richard): All of are employees have to be retrain and new card issued by Dec.2019 is that correct on the new MEWP and also the trainer.

 

A: Hi Richard! Thank you for your question. All currently trained operators must be trained to the new standards by December 20th, 2019 and have proof of that training. Although ANSI does not require that an operator carry a wallet card, cards are a very convenient way to show proof that they have received training. Anyone who trains others on MEWPs must also be qualified operators so that requirement will pertain to them as well. Please also keep in mind that, in the United States, anyone who directly supervises a MEWP operator must also receive specific training as outlined in the standard. Genie offers operator training courses, both online and classroom-based, classroom-based train the trainer courses and MEWP Supervisor courses, both online and classroom-based so please visit our website for more information.

 

Q (Cory Rohs): Please tell me what the tie off rule is in a MEWP; Can I use a 6 foot shock absorbing lanyard, Can I use a Retractable, do I have to be in fall restraint,. I thought he plan was to come out with a “Y” Lanyard and use a 5 foot when working and use a the three foot leg when driving? I realize that the scissor lift or Type one does not require to be tied off in. 

 

A: Hi Cory! Thank you for your question. As you know, OSHA’s Aerial Lift Regulation requires all occupants in boom‐supported mobile elevating work platforms (MEWPs), which includes articulated, telescopic and trailer-mounted booms, to wear personal fall protection with the lanyard attached to the designated anchorage whenever they are in the platform. A personal fall arrest system used on a boom type MEWP cannot allow the operator to free fall more than 6 feet, exceed 1,800 lb. arresting force or allow the operator to come into contact with any lower surface. Because of that, the use of a six-foot shock-absorbing lanyard is never allowed on its own. Instead, the use of a full body harness with double lanyard (fall arrest and fall restraint) may be used. The fall restraint lanyard shall be used during travel and when platform height is below the calculated total fall distance. The fall arrest lanyard can be used when the platform height is above the calculated total fall distance and when other factors, as listed below, have been taken into consideration. A self‐retracting lifeline/lanyard can be used when the platform height is above the lanyard manufacturer’s minimum anchor elevation point and when other factors have been taken into consideration. For more detailed information please see the Genie Aerial Pros article at //aerialpros.genielift.com/2019/05/16/harness-genie-aerial-lift/. 

 

Q (Tim): Question about the Annual Insp. decal #52865 ? do you have to have the “inspected by” “machine owner” boxes filled out also besides the date. 

 

A: Hi Tim! Thank you for your question. The ANSI A92.20 design standard states, “The owner shall maintain on the MEWP a means, as provided by the manufacturer, to identify the date the last annual inspection was performed and the interval at which annual inspections are required”. However, regarding frequent and annual inspections, ANSI states that the owner or entity designated by the owner shall ensure written records include inspections performed, the date of inspection, any deficiencies found, corrective action accomplished, and identification of the person(s) performing the inspections and repairs. Those records must be retained by the designated entities for a period of at least four years. 

 

Q (Christian Manganelli): Eventually, will AI be integrated into the next generation of machines?

 

A: Hi Christian! Thank you for your question. Artificial Intelligence is becoming more and more prevalent in today’s world so there is always a possibility that at some point it may become part of MEWP design. However, the cost of that type of technology and the level of complexity it brings does not allow for its use at this time.

 

Q (Yura Stanislav): Do my machines need to have the Manual of Responsibilities on board?

 

A: Hi Yura! Thank you for your question. The answer to your question remains to be seen. The previous ANSI A92 standards required that the latest Manual of Responsibilities be on the machine, and it was also required in the latest version. However, as one of the appeals to the ANSI A92 standards pertained to the Manual of Responsibilities, we will have to wait until the A92 committee decides on how they are going to respond to the ruling before we know exactly what will be required.

 

Q (Rakesh Wilkinson): What is changing with operator training? 

 

A: Hi Rakesh! Thank you for your question. Operator training will be very similar to what it has been but there will be many additions within the content as required by the new standards. The training must now cover proper selection of the correct MEWP for the work to be performed. It must cover how to perform a workplace Risk Assessment, including Rescue Planning. The training must also cover Occupant Instruction.

 

Although ANSI and CSA are becoming more similar to the international standard, there are still a few areas where there will be differences. For example, in the United States, if allowed by the employer, ANSI will allow qualified operators, who have already received proper training and are qualified to operate other aerials, to self-familiarize on machines they have not yet operated within the same classification they have been trained on. CSA will still require Canadian operators to be familiarized by a qualified person.

 

ANSI will not impose a specific retraining period for operators. It will be based upon the user’s evaluation of the operator’s capabilities. Whereas, in Canada, CSA will require that training expires after five years.

And finally, all currently trained operators will need to be trained to the new standards.

 

Q (Mike Cortez): What happens to the equipment when the new ANSI standards go into effect? 

 

A: Hi Mike! Thank you for your question. All current machines will be grandfathered in and will not require any changes or retrofitting. Any MEWP manufactured after the standards go into effect will have to have platform load sense, which means that most MEWPs will be required to continuously check the weight in the platform and disable certain functions if the load is above the platform load limit, dynamic terrain sensing, which means that that when the machine moves out of its slope limit, drive and certain boom functions will be disabled and machine functions will be restricted only to those that safely return the machine to terrain that is within limits, the elimination of chain and flexible gates, higher guard rails, and other design changes. For detailed information on the required design changes, I would recommend that you go to our ANSI A92 site on our website at //www.genielift.com/en/support/ansia92-csab354. 

 

Q (Steve McBain): Where do the responsibilities lie with the dealer, manufacturer, and end user?

 

A: Hi Steve! Thank you for your question. Although the standards have changed, there are still many responsibilities established for the dealer, manufacturer and end user. Of course, all entities are responsible for offering appropriate training and familiarization or have proof of training and familiarization for all of their employees whom they authorize to operate a MEWP. When a dealer sells, leases, rents, or provides a MEWP, when requested by the user, the dealer must offer operator training or advise the user where training can be obtained. When requested by the user, dealers must offer familiarization to the person designated to receive the MEWP. The manufacturer has the responsibility of manufacturing the machine to dimensional, operational, structural, stability and quality standards. The manufacturer has the responsibility to provide operational and maintenance instructions, and to identify the hazards associated with operating or repairing the MEWP. The manufacturer also has the responsibility to provide training materials for operator training for the MEWPs that they manufacture. The new standards place an enormous amount of responsibility on the user, which is most commonly the employer. For detailed information on those requirements, I recommend that you download the Genie white paper on the new ANSI A92 requirements by visiting //aerialpros.genielift.com/new-era-with-new-opportunities/. 

 

Q (Chaz Rutley): What does the ARA appeal last week mean for the future of the ANSI standards timeline for December 2019?

 

A: Hi Chaz! Thank you for your question. As you are probably aware, the A92.20, A92.22 and A92.24 standards were published in December 2018. In May 2019, the ANSI BSR (Board of Standards Review) heard two appeal requests made against the publication of A92.20 and A92.22, one by the American Rental Association concerning the requirement to ship a Manual of Responsibilities (“MOR”) with every machine and the other by a company called Tutus regarding a requirement to receive manufacturer’s permission prior to making a modification to a MEWP. Following the appeal hearings, the ANSI BSR decided to uphold portions of the appeals related to ANSI’s Commercial Terms policy.

 

The ANSI BSR has given the A92 committee 30 days to put together a plan to address these concerns or else ANSI will withdraw these two standards. If the A92.20 and A92.22 standards are withdrawn, there will be no new requirements to comply with in December 2019; the previous standards will continue to exist as the ANSI design and safe use requirements for Mobile Elevating Work Platforms.

 

The A92 committee chairs met on Wednesday June 5th and drafted new language to address the two issues raised by the appeals. A plan was made that will allow revised language to be submitted for committee vote – if approved, this language could be updated in the standards before December 2019.

 

Q (Rory Chandler): Do we have to get re-certified in our operator training to be up to date with the new standards?

 

A: Hi Rory! Thank you for your question. All currently trained operators must be trained to the new standards by December 20th, 2019 and have proof of that training. Although ANSI does not require that an operator carry a wallet card, cards are a very convenient way to show proof that they have received training. Anyone who trains others on MEWPs must also be qualified operators so that requirement will pertain to them as well. Please also keep in mind that, in the United States, anyone who directly supervises a MEWP operator must also receive specific training as outlined in the standard. Genie offers operator training courses, both online and classroom-based, classroom-based train the trainer courses and MEWP Supervisor courses, both online and classroom-based so please visit our website for more information. 

 

Q (Barb Schneider): If someone has an AWP aerial access card and they take our MEWP online course, do they have to go to a trainer for familiarization or can the self-familiarize? 

 

A: Hi Barb! Thank you for your question. The standards require that all currently trained and qualified operators must be trained up to the new standards. A currently trained operator may take the updated Genie Lift Pro Online MEWP Operator Training Course to bring their level of knowledge up to the new standards. In the U.S.A., and only if the employer allows it, ANSI will allow a trained and qualified operator to self-familiarize on machines within the classification in which they have already been trained. For example, if you received practical hands-on training on a Genie Z-45/25 articulating boom during your original training, you have been trained on classification 3B. If your employer allows it, you may now self-familiarize on other makes and models within that classification. However, you would not be allowed to self-familiarize on the other three classifications (1A, 1B and 3A) until you have received practical hands-on training on that classification by a qualified person. Please note that the CSA B354 standards for Canada do not allow self-familiarization. 

 

Q (Max Trenton): What are the core changes to the standards?

 

A: Hi Max! Thank you for your question. There are many changes to the standards that include nomenclature and machine classification, machine design standards, safe use planning including risk assessment and rescue planning, additional training for operators, supervisor training and occupant instruction. The changes are too vast to outline them in this format so I would recommend that you download and read the Genie white paper on the changes. You can access it by visiting: //aerialpros.genielift.com/new-era-with-new-opportunities/. 

 

Q (Ron Lin): Can a person self-train on a lift, and if so who should fill out their new MEWP aerial access card? 

 

A: Hi Ron! Thank you for your question. The ANSI standards require that an individual receive general training and practical hands-on training by a qualified trainer in order to be qualified to operate a MEWP. Upon completion of the training, the trainer will provide them with some form of proof of training. ANSI clearly identifies the information that must be in that record. It may be a certificate or wallet card (e.g. the Genie Aerial Access Card). Once an individual has received proper training and is considered qualified to operate a MEWP, then they must be familiarized on additional machines in order to be qualified to operate them. In the U.S.A., and only if the employer allows it, ANSI will allow a trained and qualified operator to self-familiarize on machines within the classification in which they have already been trained. For example, if you received practical hands-on training on a Genie Z-45/25 articulating boom during your original training, you have been trained on classification 3B. If your employer allows it, you may now self-familiarize on other makes and models within that classification. However, you would not be allowed to self-familiarize on the other three classifications (1A, 1B and 3A) until you have received practical hands-on training on that classification by a qualified person. Please note that the CSA B354 standards for Canada do not allow self-familiarization. 

 

Q (Scott Lake): We as a dealer and owner are responsible for providing training to our employees. We rent the equipment are we going to have the responsibility then to make sure the companies renting the equipment are trained to the new standards? 

 

A: Hi Scott! Thank you for your question. The user (most commonly the employer) is the entity responsible for ensuring that only trained and qualified personnel operate a MEWP. They are also responsible for providing training and familiarization, or have proof of training and familiarization for all of their employees whom they authorize to operate a MEWP. When requested by the user, the dealer or owner shall offer operator training or advise the user where training can be obtained. In addition, you are responsible for ensuring that your own personnel have been properly trained and familiarized. By educating your customers on the new standards and the need to have their employees trained, you would be providing a valuable service to them which would enhance your value proposition and strengthen your relationship with them. My suggestion would be to provide them with a copy of the Genie white paper on the standards, which can be accessed here: //aerialpros.genielift.com/new-era-with-new-opportunities/ and the Safe Use Plan Guidance document, which can be accessed here: //aerialpros.genielift.com/mewp-safe-use-plan/.